(no subject)

Feb. 25th, 2017 04:05 pm
yhlee: Alto clef and whole note (middle C). (alto clef)
[personal profile] yhlee
Fantastic video takedown of why the Marvel movies have terrible scoring and, more generally, the problem of temp tracks in film scoring [Youtube]. Particularly scathing was the analysis of one scene where the music was basically compared to room tone. Ouch! But I cannot argue the point.

Also, film composers ALL hate temp tracks, haha, but that's not news to anyone at this point!

(I can't figure out how to embed this, sorry! The Youtube "share" thing confuses me.)

(Thanks to Seth Dickinson.)

(no subject)

Feb. 25th, 2017 02:45 pm
sraun: birthday cake (cake birthday)
[personal profile] sraun
Happy Birthday [livejournal.com profile] saintonge

Le Tarot d'Ambre: Un complot

Feb. 25th, 2017 02:43 pm
yhlee: Amber Tarot Knight of Swords: Benedict (Tarot d'Ambre: Benedict)
[personal profile] yhlee
Le Tarot d'Ambre par F. Nedelec, cont'd

A plot

Read more... )
jetpack_angel: (csim_speed_fu)
[personal profile] jetpack_angel posting in [community profile] fucking_meds
Okay, how to word this delicately... I've heard of antidepressants competely removing one's desire to *ahem* play with fireworks, but my Effexor buddy and I have discovered another, possibly worse variant: you still kinda wanna *cough* play with fireworks sometimes, but all the powder is gone.

...All right, screw it, we're all adults here and I'm still pissed about it. I had some alone time yesterday. Two hours and a full pack of AA batteries later, all I got was numb junk, a sore arm, and a slow back-burner rage that comes from two hours of "oh, come on, it's RIGHT THERE!!!" Lots of firecrackers were lit, but there was no bang. I bitched to my Effexor buddy (who's recently added Welbutrin to the family) and her first response was "Oh thank God it's not just me." So I decided to ask my friend who's a sexology major / psych major. She'd never heard of any research done on this problem. So I'd like to give her some data to work with.

Anybody else? 

Sudden edit: I see that there's the existence of a side effect tag called Anorgasmia. Is that this thing, is that its name? How common is it? ARE YOU EFFING KIDDING ME?!

Confusion of meaning

Feb. 25th, 2017 03:31 pm
oursin: A cloud of words from my LJ (word cloud)
[personal profile] oursin

Something to do while waiting for your flight instead of browsing the duty-free?

Helsinki airport is decorated with stuffed hares and wolverine, and much of its rich animal life – beavers, lynx, bears – can be shot under a strict licence system.

Enquiring minds wish to know whether licences may be obtained in the departure lounge and whether guns may be hired there as well... though my own thought would be, and are these large predators any threat to travellers who just want to sit and have a drink and try to log on to the airport wifi?

Okay, that garbled sentence, in an article about wolf culling in Finland does follow on from this one: 'Finland has 300,000 amateur hunters, more than 5% of its population.'

But I would consider this serious punctuation fail, no? Do people not read over their text, and are there not editors?

Am somewhat reminded of my speculations about suburban foxhunts of suburban foxes, with concomittent suburban sabs.

Surprise! Surprise!

Feb. 25th, 2017 08:59 am
supergee: (trump)
[personal profile] supergee
Caitlyn Jenner notices a problem with the Leopards Eating People's Faces Party.

Oh, it's so beautiful

Feb. 25th, 2017 12:57 pm
rydra_wong: The display board of a train reads "this train is fucked". (this train is fucked)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Via [personal profile] robynbender: it seems that Milo Yiannopoulos was brought down by a 16-year-old girl who knows how to Google.

Apparently we are living in a YA dystopian novel, and I for one welcome our new teenage girl leaders.

Killer drug

Feb. 25th, 2017 06:26 am
supergee: (peace)
[personal profile] supergee
Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) (that’s two) warns that marijuana bales would be a uniquely efficacious way to smuggle in nukes. Reminds me of the joke that Irish Customs caught someone smuggling in condoms disguised as cocaine.

(no subject)

Feb. 25th, 2017 11:25 am
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] brigid, [personal profile] choirwoman, [personal profile] tigerflower and [personal profile] toft!

Jerome Tuccille (1937-2017)

Feb. 25th, 2017 05:11 am
supergee: (mourning)
[personal profile] supergee
I just wrote about Robert Nozick, who made libertarianism serious, and now we lose the guy who made it funny. In 1971 Jerome Tuccille wrote It Usually Begins With Ayn Rand, which he described as a “libertarian odyssey.” For my money, it is still the best, or at least funniest, book on the movement, though I admit he sometimes transcended mere fact.

He stopped calling himself a libertarian, after an effort to run for office (governor of NY) on the Libertarian ticket that ended about as well as such things usually do. He somewhat reratted to conservatism, working as a stockbroker and writing bios of malefactors of great wealth (starting with Donald Trump). He never lost his distrust of the State, though, particularly on lifestyle issues. He wrote many books on many topics, though for me he never recaptured the greatness of It Usually Begins With Ayn Rand.

Short Fiction: February 24, 2017

Feb. 25th, 2017 02:11 am
bibliogramma: (Default)
[personal profile] bibliogramma


"The Great Detective," Delia Sherman; tor.com, February 17, 2016
http://www.tor.com/2016/02/17/the-great-detective-delia-sherman/

Steampunk and spiritualism, in an alternate literary universe where noted mechanical inventor Sir Arthur Cwmlech and his apprentice Miss Tacy Gof turn to colleague Mycroft Holmes and his masterwork the Reasoning Machine to solve a mysterious theft. A young Doctor Watson, recently returned from Afghanistan, seeks a new life as an inventor. All that is missing from the tale is the Great Detective himself - and if he does not yet exist, then surely someone will have to invent him. A light and witty tale that should appeal to fans of Holmes and the steampunk genre alike.

"Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies," Brooke Bolander; Uncanny magazine, November 2016
http://uncannymagazine.com/article/talons-can-crush-galaxies/

This was a short piece, essentially flash fiction, a stunning gut-punch. Hard to read, hard to breathe afterward. Searing and powerful indictment of male entitlement and rape culture.


"Seasons of Glass and Iron," Amal El-Motar; first published in The Starlit World (2016), reprinted online at Uncanny Magazine
http://uncannymagazine.com/article/seasons-glass-iron/

There are many fairy tales about women. Women who must do impossible things, or accept impossible circumstances, because of men. Men who say they love them, men who want to test them, men who want to woo and win them. Sometimes, though, these women walk out of those tales and live their own lives instead, creating new kinds of tales.


"Lullaby for a Lost World," Aliette de Bodard; Tor.com, June 8, 2016
http://www.tor.com/2016/06/08/lullaby-for-a-lost-world/

De Bodard has said that of this story that it is "a sort of answer to “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” (one of my absolute favourite short stories)." It is very much a story about the prices paid for security, stability, and the like - and who makes the decisions on what prices are acceptable, and who pays those prices. A worthy counterpart to the story that inspired it.


"Things with Beards," Sam J. Miller; Clarkesworld, June 2016
http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/miller_06_16/

A meditation on monsters and how they walk undetected in the world, both the monsters and evil aliens of speculative fiction (the backstory of the protagonist evokes the classic sf/horror film The Thing), and the monsters that have always been a part of the human race, the callous, the cruel, the killers of those who are labeled less than human.


"You'll Surely Drown Here if You Stay," Alyssa Wong;
Uncanny Magazine, May 2016
http://uncannymagazine.com/article/youll-surely-drown-stay/

A young boy with an uncanny heritage to communicate with, and control, the dead is forced to use his powers for the greed of others. A supernatural Western with a deep friendship that survives dead and retribution at its heart.


"An Ocean the Color of Bruises," Isabel Yap; Uncanny Magazine, July 2016
http://uncannymagazine.com/article/ocean-color-bruises/

Five young people, former college friends, take a vacation together to a second-class resort with a tragic past. When that past awakens, the quality of their own lives is called into question.


"A Fist of Permutations in Lightning and Wildflower," Alyssa Wong; Tor.com, March 2, 2016
http://www.tor.com/2016/03/02/a-fist-of-permutations-in-lightning-and-wildflowers-alyssa-wong/

A story about two sisters with unimaginable power, the depth of grief and guilt, and the futility of trying to change the past. Deep truths about grieving, accepting and moving on - and the tragedy of refusing to do so.


"Red in Tooth and Cog," Cat Rambo; originally published in Fantasy and Science Fiction, March/April 2016, republished online February 21, 2017
http://www.kittywumpus.net/blog/2017/02/21/story-red-in-tooth-and-cog/

A young woman frequenting a park has her phone stolen by an unlikely culprit, leading her to discover a new ecosystem in development. An interesting perspective on the definitions of life.


“Blood Grains Speak Through Memories”, Jason Sanford; Beneath Ceaseless Skies, March 17, 2016
http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/stories/blood-grains-speak-through-memories/

Sanford's novelette is set in what seems to be a far distant future, long after the ecological disasters of pollution and the exploitation of natural resources have resulted in massive social change and, one infers, biological engineering on a vast scale. The land is infused with "grains" - semi-sentient beings, possibly organic, possibly cybernetic, it's never made clear - that infect people thereafter known as anchors - who are responsible for protecting the land and its ecosystems. Anyone not part of an anchor's family is doomed to a nomadic existence, destroyed by the anchors and other beings created/controlled by the grains if they tarry to long in one place, or injure the land in any way. Frere-Jones is an anchor dissatisfied with the way the grains control the anchors and limit the lives of the nomadic day-fellows. Her husband, who shared her opinions, was killed by the grains, and if they could replace her, Frere-Jones suspects the grains would kill her too.

I was both intrigued and dissatisfied with this novelette. I enjoyed the themes of rebellion and of sacrifice, but I was frustrated at knowing so little about the grains, the biomorphing of the anchors, and how it all came to be that way. Perhaps a longer format might have allowed more worldbuilding.

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