A reading list of books by women

May. 3rd, 2016 12:55 am
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[personal profile] bibliogramma

Another list of books one may or may jot have read, this time with an admirable theme: "100 MUST-READ SCI-FI FANTASY NOVELS BY FEMALE AUTHORS" by Nikki Steele. It's a good list, all in all - there's something for everyone here.

I've read about a third of these, have several more waiting on my ipad to be read, and have more still on my my "acquire when cash flow makes it possible" list. There are also some books I tried and didn't like enough to complete, and some that just did not call to me, or whose authors I don't seem to enjoy.

I've bolded the ones I've read, and put asterisks after the ones I want to read (i.e., have on my TBR or TBB (to be bought) lists.


1. Alanna: The First Adventure by Tamora Pierce

2. The Alchemy of Stone by Ekaterina Sedia

3. Among Others by Jo Walton

4. Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie

5. Ancient, Ancient by Kiini Ibura Salaam *

6. The Antelope Wife by Louise Erdrich *

7. Arrows of the Queen by Mercedes Lackey

8. Ash by Malinda Lo

9. Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb

10. The Pyramid Waltz by Barbara Wright

11. Biting the Sun by Tanith Lee

12. The Blazing World by Margaret Cavendish *

13. The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter *

14. Boneshaker by Cherie Priest

15. Brown Girl in the Ringby Nalo Hopkinson

16. Cast in Shadow by Michelle Sagara

17. China Mountain Zhang by Maureen F. McHugh

18. Chorus of Mushrooms by Hiromi Goto *

19. Cinder by Marissa Meyer

20. The Crystal Cave by Mary Stewart

21. The Darkangel by Meredith Ann Pierce

22. Daughter of Smoke & Bone by Laini Taylor *

23. Daughter of the Blood by Anne Bishop

24. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier

25. Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris

26. Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente *

27. The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen

28. The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin

29. Doomsday Book by Connie Willis *

30. Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara *

31. Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey

32. An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir *

33. The Etched City by K.J. Bishop

34. The Female Man by Joanna Russ

35. Flesh and Spirit by Carol Berg

36. The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia A. McKillip

37. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

38. The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo *

39. Graceling by Kristin Cashore *

40. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

41. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

42. The Hearing Trumpet by Leonora Carrington

43. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever by James Tiptree Jr.

44. Hild by Nicola Griffith *

45. His Majesty’s Dragon by Naomi Novik

46. The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

47. The House on the Lagoon by Rosario Ferré

48. Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

49. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

50. Ink by Sabrina Vourvoulias *

51. Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

52. The Island of Eternal Love by Daína Chaviano

53. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke

54. Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear

55. The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin *

56. Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey

57. Luck in the Shadows by Lynn Flewelling

58. Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link

59. The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley *

60. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

61. Moving the Mountain by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

62. Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi *

63. My Christina & Other Stories by Mercè Rodoreda

64. My Soul to Keep by Tananarive Due

65. Native Tongue by Suzette Haden Elgin

66. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

67. Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

68. The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender

69. The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

70. The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

71. The Red by Linda Nagata *

72. Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord

73. Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire

74. Salt Fish Girl by Larissa Lai *

75. The Second Mango by Shira Glassman *

76. Shards of Honor by Lois McMaster Bujold

77. Shikasta by Doris Lessing

78. The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge

79. Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh

80. So Far from God by Ana Castillo

81. Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

82. Soulless by Gail Carriger *

83. The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell *

84. The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon

85. Spirits of the Ordinary by Kathleen Alcala

86. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel *

87. A Stranger in Olondria by Sofia Samatar *

88. Sunshine by Robin McKinley

89. Swamplandia! by Karen Russell

90. Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner

91. The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

92. Valor’s Choice by Tanya Huff

93. War for the Oaks by Emma Bull

94. We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson *

95. Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor

96. Wicked As They Come by Delilah S. Dawson

97. Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

98. The Woman Who Thought She Was a Planet and Other Stories by Vandana Singh

99. The Wrath and the Dawn by Renée Ahdieh

100. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

good old Canada

May. 2nd, 2016 10:51 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Apparently so many Canadians went online to fill out census, we crashed the servers.

A book list!

May. 2nd, 2016 06:59 pm
firecat: red panda looking happy (Default)
[personal profile] firecat
"100 MUST-READ SCI-FI FANTASY NOVELS BY FEMALE AUTHORS" by Nikki Steele, who writes, "Do note that I’ve only listed the first book in any given series."

I think this is a very good list. I have bolded the ones I've read, check-marked the ones I own but haven't read yet, and starred the ones I especially liked. I'm feeling especially hard to please when it comes to fiction these days, and I want to reflect that, so I didn't give out very many stars. I don't mean to suggest the ones I didn't give a star to are bad, just that they didn't get me super-excited.

If you've read any of these authors, I want to hear what you liked by them!

1. Alanna: The First Adventure by Tamora Pierce

2. The Alchemy of Stone by Ekaterina Sedia

*3. Among Others by Jo Walton

*4. Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie


√5. Ancient, Ancient by Kiini Ibura Salaam

√6. The Antelope Wife by Louise Erdrich

7. Arrows of the Queen by Mercedes Lackey

8. Ash by Malinda Lo

9. Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb

10. The Pyramid Waltz by Barbara Wright

11. Biting the Sun by Tanith Lee

12. The Blazing World by Margaret Cavendish

*13. The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter

√14. Boneshaker by Cherie Priest

15. Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson

16. Cast in Shadow by Michelle Sagara

√17. China Mountain Zhang by Maureen F. McHugh

18. Chorus of Mushrooms by Hiromi Goto

19. Cinder by Marissa Meyer

20. The Crystal Cave by Mary Stewart

21. The Darkangel by Meredith Ann Pierce

22. Daughter of Smoke & Bone by Laini Taylor

23. Daughter of the Blood by Anne Bishop

24. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier

25. Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris (Didn't finish the series.)

√26. Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente

27. The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen

28. The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin (Probably her most "important" book but not the one I would have picked as her best or my favorite.)

29. Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

30. Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara

31. Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey

32. An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

33. The Etched City by K.J. Bishop

34. The Female Man by Joanna Russ

35. Flesh and Spirit by Carol Berg

36. The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia A. McKillip (Tried, bounced)

37. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

38. The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo

39. Graceling by Kristin Cashore

40. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

*41. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling


42. The Hearing Trumpet by Leonora Carrington

*43. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever by James Tiptree Jr.

*44. Hild by Nicola Griffith

45. His Majesty’s Dragon by Naomi Novik


46. The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

47. The House on the Lagoon by Rosario Ferré

48. Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

49. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

50. Ink by Sabrina Vourvoulias

51. Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

52. The Island of Eternal Love by Daína Chaviano

53. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke

54. Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear

*55. The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin (This duology is excellent but I liked the Inheritance series better.)

56. Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey

57. Luck in the Shadows by Lynn Flewelling

√58. Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link

59. The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley

*60. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

61. Moving the Mountain by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

62. Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi

63. My Christina & Other Stories by Mercè Rodoreda

64. My Soul to Keep by Tananarive Due (Haven't read this one. I liked Joplin's Ghost though.)

65. Native Tongue by Suzette Haden Elgin

66. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

67. Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

68. The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender

69. The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

*70. The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater (Really like this series.)

71. The Red by Linda Nagata

√72. Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord

*73. Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire (Really like this series.)

74. Salt Fish Girl by Larissa Lai

75. The Second Mango by Shira Glassman

76. Shards of Honor by Lois McMaster Bujold (Have read the whole series.)

77. Shikasta by Doris Lessing

78. The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge

79. Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh (Started, bounced)

80. So Far from God by Ana Castillo

√81. Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

*82. Soulless by Gail Carriger (Really like this series.)

83. The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

84. The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon


85. Spirits of the Ordinary by Kathleen Alcala

86. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

87. A Stranger in Olondria by Sofia Samatar (Reading now)

88. Sunshine by Robin McKinley (Have read other good stuff by her.)

89. Swamplandia! by Karen Russell

*90. Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner

91. The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

92. Valor’s Choice by Tanya Huff

93. War for the Oaks by Emma Bull

94. We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

√95. Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor

96. Wicked As They Come by Delilah S. Dawson

97. Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

98. The Woman Who Thought She Was a Planet and Other Stories by Vandana Singh (I've probably read some of the stories in here.)

99. The Wrath and the Dawn by Renée Ahdieh

100. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
sturgeonslawyer: (Default)
[personal profile] sturgeonslawyer
Rather longer than the first two books in the "Argo" or "The Devil is Dead" trilogy, _More Than Melchisedech_ is a polymorph, it keeps changing shape. It starts out looking like the life of a magician (the titular Melchisedech, or sometimes Michael, Duffey). Then it becomes a set of apocalyptic fantasies. And it ends as - but that would be giving away too much, wouldn't it?

And that's just the main novel: it is epilogued with a few short stories that compliment and contribute to the whole, and, indeed, the ending of the trilogy proper is embedded in the last of these stories, "How Many Miles to Babylon," in which - but that would also be giving away _much_ too much.

But this third book _does_ explain the lanky and disjoint feel of the trilogy as a whole. It is about huge issues like, well, the Apocalypse, and the nature of the Church, and what it means to be human (and superhuman and subhuman and parahuman), and the whole thing may be a huge shaggy human story.

But be that as it may, it's an engaging - in a lanky and disjoing way - novel, funny - in a "H'mmm" way more than a "Bwahahaha" way - and full of depth, though the depths of it are not easily plumbed: I'm quite certain that I missed a great deal.

The closest thing to a comparison I can come up with for Lafferty's masterpiece is Gene Wolfe's Solar Cycle, a monumental work that says as much by what it doesn't say (and alludes to or elides) as by what it does. Sadly, Lafferty never had the publicity or popularity (well, more or less) of Wolfe, but his work is still there for those who can find it.
jesse_the_k: sign reads "torture chamber unsuitable for wheelchair users" (even more access fail)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Nineteen ninety-three: I got my first powerchair, my city began a growth spurt, and the ADA design guidelines had just been published. This should have meant smooth rolling: many new accessible buildings!
Yet many accessible locations are destroyed by deliberate barriers )

This is the continual battle against the normate space invaders. This is why accessible design and construction isn't enough.

If you think this barrier wasn't really created on purpose, that it's just the thoughtlessness of the ill-informed, I know that's not the case. I've visited this particular shop to inform them they've recreated barriers unnecessarily, and asked them to stop destroying the built-in accessibility. Their response is Oh, don't worry, we'll be happy to help if you just ask.

Nondisabled people may wonder, so what's so hard about asking? Great effort has been made to create accessible environments. Why should this thoughtless disablism require us to ask permission over and over? We are here; we are the public, as Dave Hingsburger put it so eloquently. When nondisabled people recolonize our spaces, we must regroup, react, and respond.

A Year of Tanith Lee Extension

May. 2nd, 2016 07:32 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Because I missed a week for the Year of Tanith Lee, I am extending the series until the end of 2016. This means I need ten more Tanith Lee title. Open to suggestion. The ones I am already planning to review are:
Read more... )
commodorified: the words Anglican Socialist Weirdo on a Green and Yellow abstract background (Anglican Socialist Weirdo)
[personal profile] commodorified
"... The times are inexpressibly evil. Christians pay conscious, indeed religious tribute, to Caesar and Mars; by the approval of overkill tactics, by brinkmanship, by nuclear liturgies, by racism, by support of genocide. They embrace their society with all their heart, and abandon the cross. They pay lip service to Christ and military service to the powers of death. And yet, and yet, the times are inexhaustibly good, solaced by the courage and hope of many. The truth rules, Christ is not forsaken.

In a time of death, some men—the resisters, those who work hardily for social change, those who preach and embrace the unpalatable truth—such men overcome death, their lives are bathed in the light of the resurrection, the truth has set them free. In the jaws of death, of contumely, of good and ill report, they proclaim their love of the brethren. We think of such men, in the world, in our nation, in the churches; and the stone in our breast is dissolved; we take heart once more."

NRA: Everyone dies, rocks fall

May. 2nd, 2016 09:58 pm
[syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed

Posted by Fred Clark

It was poor planning on Bruce's part not to inform his congregation about the first five of the Seal Judgments until after they had already begun. It seems like that bit would have been both more impressive and more practical if he'd shared this information before the war and famine and mass-martyrdom began. But there's still just barely time to foretell the next big calamity in the sequence -- the massive earthquake that John's Apocalypse describes as the sixth seal.

[Writing] Notes to self

May. 2nd, 2016 02:23 pm
minim_calibre: (Default)
[personal profile] minim_calibre
While it makes for a stronger story in the end, retyping the damn thing can and will introduce additional errors. Please take note of that and plan accordingly, no matter how many times you'd gone over that in the original draft.

Also, your spellcheck will tend to ignore proper nouns, or things it thinks are proper nouns.

Therefore, manually check all of them.

The longer the story, the greater the chance that all these things will be issues, and the greater the chance that eyes on the page will miss them before posting.

Signed,

OMG, I think I have finally found everything I shouldn't have gone out with.

The problematical author

May. 2nd, 2016 04:15 pm
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[personal profile] wcg
There is an uncomfortable truth that most worthwhile books were written by people who held ideas that are at odds with current views. One obvious case is Charles Darwin, whose Origin of Species is undoubtedly one of the greatest pieces of scholarship in human history, but who also held ideas about race and society which shock the sensibilities of the present day.

In the sciences, we've learned to separate the good work from the flawed ideas. Watson and Crick will always be acknowledged for their work with DNA (even as many of us also point out the critical contribution of Rosalind Franklin) while their unfortunate pronouncements on topics such as obesity, homosexuality, and religion remind us that even the most brilliant minds are still products of the societies from which they come.

I'm currently reading Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 chapters by Matt Ridley. My previous acquaintance with Ridley has been as a climate change skeptic, and because of that I hesitated to read his book about genetics. But as I near the end of it, I have to confess I've found very little to quibble with, and nothing at all concerning his subject matter of biology and genetics. It is a bit dated now, having originally been published in 1999 before the human genome was sequenced, and updated in 2006, but it is still very, very good.

I recommend it to anyone interested in genetics and/or good science writing.

They're not wrong

May. 2nd, 2016 02:41 pm
telophase: (Default)
[personal profile] telophase
I found this photo on Tumblr with the caption "This is a wizard battle and you can't convince me otherwise."

Hands up! by Georg Charf )

An odd disadvantage of efficiency

May. 2nd, 2016 02:18 pm
redbird: London travelcard (travelcard)
[personal profile] redbird
I'm in Montreal for a long weekend with [livejournal.com profile] rysmiel and [livejournal.com profile] papersky; we have had lots of good food and good conversation. I'm flying back tomorrow around lunchtime, so when rysmiel and I came back from a walk, I logged into the Air Canada site and checked in for my flight. All very sensible; I changed my seat, paid to check my bag (I've bought a few things, some of them liquid), and printed my boarding pass. But it makes me feel a little bit like the visit is almost over, even though about a quarter of it is left, and we have actual plans for this evening.

The odd thing about visiting this time of year is that spring is much more advanced in Boston than in Montreal: a lot less is in bloom here (the forsythia are just starting, and they were close to done by the time I headed to the Boston airport Friday morning), and most of the trees are bare. (Montreal in January, or for that matter August, is probably going to be colder than New York or Boston, but it's not so visually different.)

Last night

May. 2nd, 2016 02:24 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Because I was looking down at my phone to post something, I missed that the bus I was on was detoured and got very disoriented. Could not for the life of me work out where in downtown Kitchener I was. Didn't work it out until the bus got to Queen and Joseph.
minim_calibre: (Default)
[personal profile] minim_calibre
Last night I blocked a sex scene with stick figures in fountain pen using J. Herbin violet-scented ink on a Rhodia dotpad.

I feel like this is such an egregious misuse of materials that someone's going to come and take my pen collection away.

The worst part is that I'm not sure it actually *helped* any.

[Fic] There was, There Wasn't (MCU)

May. 2nd, 2016 10:09 am
minim_calibre: (Default)
[personal profile] minim_calibre
There Was, There Wasn't (13515 words) by Minim Calibre
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Captain America (Movies), Marvel Cinematic Universe
Rating: Explicit
Warnings: Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
Relationships: Steve Rogers/Natasha Romanov
Characters: Natasha Romanov, Steve Rogers, Sam Wilson, Nick Fury
Additional Tags: Friends With Limited-Time Benefits, Platonic Sex
Summary:

After New York, Fury had asked for her assessment of Rogers.




My self-imposed media blackout and the May 5th deadline (US Civil War opening--I'm so stupidly paranoid about spoilers that I actually turned off AO3 alerts for the week) finally forced me to finish the thing!

As I said on Tumblr, I'm probably not kidding when I say that this is a story that I wrote for me and I'm not sure anyone else needs to have a burning desire to read.

(Seriously, self? 13k? Really?)

(Yes, really. Jesus.)

Just wondering...

May. 2nd, 2016 05:54 pm
oursin: George Beresford photograph of Marie of Roumania, overwritten 'And I AM Marie of Roumania' (Marie of Roumania)
[personal profile] oursin

On the one hand, yes, I sorta see what's being got at here:

Yet there is a further curiosity here. This summer’s female-friendship movies do not just share a theme and a gender but a genre, too. They are all comedies. Could it be that this is another reason women’s stories can be taken less seriously? Cinema has long prized drama over everything else. The lighter something appears, the easier it is to dismiss.
but on the other hand I am also going, depending upon what you mean by comedies, they have a certain amount of staying power, and the screwball comedies of a bygone era still hold up pretty well (to mention a genre in which women played a prominent part: the romantic weepies, not so much, but the noir, yes, those too), and wottabaht Jane Austen, and so on, and comedy is actually difficult (says Tonstant Weader who has recently given up, sighing deeply, on a supposedly humorous sff satire/parody/pastiche as a) trying too hard and b) going for the obvious targets).

***

Dept of, I think there's subtext here, or am I being Old and Cynical in think this is all about the wanting to shag other people:

My girlfriend and I decided we would travel the world together for a year. The problem is that I’m having second thoughts about whether to go with her. Bearing in mind that we are both 25 years old and have been seeing each other exclusively for 10 years, I feel there may be more to experience going separately than together. Do you think I should bury this scepticism and go ahead with plans knowing that this may reveal future resentment in our relationship, or do we go our separate ways in hopes of living our desired futures?

RIP Daniel Berrigan

May. 2nd, 2016 03:24 pm
[syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed

Posted by Fred Clark

"One may reject the claims of sainthood made on his behalf (he never made any such claim himself, by the way), one may also reject sainthood as an ideal and therefore feel that his basic aims were anti-human: but regarded simply as a politician, and compared with the other leading political figures of our time, how clean a smell he has managed to leave behind!"

Hippo, Birdie, Two Ewes

May. 2nd, 2016 08:54 am
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[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to [personal profile] dakiwiboid !  How ya doon?  Day of fun, enchantment, and joy!

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